Karin Weber Gallery

Xu Jingwen: Landscape Series 1

Xu Jingwen: Landscape Series 2

Xu Jingwen: Landscape Series 3

Xu Jingwen: Landscape Series 5

Xu Jingwen: Plain Scenery Series 2

Xu Jingwen: Plain Scenery Series 6

Xu Jingwen: Plain Scenery Series 25

Xu Jingwen: Bamboo Forest

Angel Hui Hoi Kiu: Here, There

Angel Hui Hoi Kiu: Travel

Angel Hui Hoi Kiu: Fish in Ceramics I

Angel Hui Hoi Kiu: Fish in Ceramics II

Angel Hui Hoi Kiu: Fish in Ceramics III

Angel Hui Hoi Kiu: Fragments of a Blue Flower

Exhibition Details

Exhibition

'Seeking Inner Peace:'
Works in Ink by Xu Jingwen and Angel Hui

Date + Time

27 January - 8 March, 2016

Location

Karin Weber Gallery

Opening Reception

26 January, 2016
6pm - 9pm

eCatalog
Info

For more than two thousand years, ink, in the form of calligraphy and later painting, has been the primary medium in China. Beginning in the twentieth century, however, new artistic concepts introduced from abroad began to infiltrate modern and contemporary art practices in China. The impact of new mediums and subjects was clearly evident with China’s opening up, as works in oil with political themes gained the attention of curators, institutions, the media and collectors.

Alongside these new developments and just outside the spotlight, ink artists continued to develop and innovate as they, too, processed innumerable influences flowing into new China. Given Ink’s place and prestige in Chinese history, this has been no easy task. In Seeking Inner Peace: Works in Ink by Xu Jingwen and Angel Hui, Karin Weber gallery presents two young artists who demonstrate the ancient cultural tradition of seeking cultural regeneration through the reinterpretation of past exemplars.

For more than two thousand years, ink, in the form of calligraphy and later painting, has been the primary medium in China. Beginning in the twentieth century, however, new artistic concepts introduced from abroad began to infiltrate modern and contemporary art practices in China. The impact of new mediums and subjects was clearly evident with China’s opening up, as works in oil with political themes gained the attention of curators, institutions, the media and collectors.

Alongside these new developments and just outside the spotlight, ink artists continued to develop and innovate as they, too, processed innumerable influences flowing into new China. Given Ink’s place and prestige in Chinese history, this has been no easy task. In Seeking Inner Peace: Works in Ink by Xu Jingwen and Angel Hui, Karin Weber gallery presents two young artists who demonstrate the ancient cultural tradition of seeking cultural regeneration through the reinterpretation of past exemplars.

For Xu, it is the spiritual side of humankind he seeks to reflect in his landscape paintings. His small, focused landscapes — depicting trees, rocks, clouds and sky – are purposely devoid of human presence. Xu’s intention, in purposely eschewing a large-scale format, is to immerse the viewer in the peaceful settings he creates. With these works, Xu hopes to capture the spirit of the artist and all mankind by encouraging the viewer to commune with nature.

For Hui, Chinese visual culture is a reflection of traditional Chinese cultural traditions. In her works, this takes the form of symbolic subject matter seeped in meaning for generations of Chinese. Hui dedicates her practice to the examination of traditional Chinese motifs, symbols and patterns found on objects and ceremonial decorations. By coupling age-old concepts with the unique influences of the present, such as ready-made and often disposable items, Hui suggests an innovative way of reflecting on tradition in the present day.