Karin Weber Gallery

Huang Zhe: Cryptic Gravity Series No.6

Huang Zhe: Carl Sagan’s Footsteps Series No.3

Huang Zhe: Cryptic Gravity Series No.3

Huang Zhe: Photo Album

Huang Zhe: Plant

Hong Dan: White Object

Hong Dan: Memory No.4

Hong Dan: Memory No.6

Hong Dan: Memory No.7

Hong Dan: Memory No.8

Yang Fang Tao: The Curved Horizon

Yang Fang Tao: Going Downhill Is A Delight

Yang Fang Tao: Landscape No.10

Yang Fang Tao: Landscape No.28

Yang Fang Tao: Landscape No.32

Yang Fang Tao: Landscape No.33

Yang Fang Tao: Landscape No.35

Exhibition Details

Exhibition

'Triple Domes:'
Works by Huang Zhe, Hong Dan & Yang Fang Tao,
curated by Peng Jie

Date + Time

4 November -
31 December, 2016

Location

Karin Weber Gallery

Opening Reception

3 November 2016
6pm - 9pm

eCatalog
Info

In ancient Chinese philosophy, a dome is a metaphor for heaven, an unreachable boundary for all human life perpetuating beneath. A dome can also reflect an individual consciousness or truth, which is shaped by experiences of time and space to create memories, dreams and illusions.

Karin Weber Gallery is excited to present three new Chinese artists in ‘Triple Domes: Works by Huang Zhe, Hong Dan and Yang Fang Tao.’ ‘Triple Domes’ echo each artist’s own time and memory streams, loosely shaped by a shared national boundary and ethnicity, yet entirely individual in the way that perceived boundaries are transcended and new expressive heights are reached.

In ancient Chinese philosophy, a dome is a metaphor for heaven, an unreachable boundary for all human life perpetuating beneath. A dome can also reflect an individual consciousness or truth, which is shaped by experiences of time and space to create memories, dreams and illusions.

Karin Weber Gallery is excited to present three new Chinese artists in ‘Triple Domes: Works by Huang Zhe, Hong Dan and Yang Fang Tao.’ ‘Triple Domes’ echo each artist’s own time and memory streams, loosely shaped by a shared national boundary and ethnicity, yet entirely individual in the way that perceived boundaries are transcended and new expressive heights are reached.

By skilfully combining painting and laser materials, Huang Zhe presents what diffusion would look like when the spectrum of light is dissolved. Inspiring these dazzling works is the artist’s own fascination with the contemporary cityscape’s innate interrelationship, one that is both addictive and mesmerizing. Hong Dan’s paintings adopt distinctive forms of mutation. The interplay between materials and their presentation is what can be seen in diaries or albums, connecting the lives and thoughts of the past and presence, showcasing different colors and textures. Yang Fang Tao’s solitary boy in blue is someone who looks for a return to his own secrets under the dome of heaven, be it in nature or in the city, he runs, gazing upward, as he circles among maze-like pathways.